Posts Tagged ‘Gulf Cartel’

Mexico’s Drug War Heats Up Again

Thursday, June 29th, 2017

Mexico’s drug war is one of those news stories that’s been crowded off America’s front pages by the tide of #FakeNews. How can the MSM find time to cover dead Mexicans if Donald Trump’s doorman might have once talked to a Russian?

I say “drug war” but that should probably be “drug wars,” in that each government crackdown on particular cartels, wars between rival cartels, and wars between different factions of the same cartel are all different events, and different parts of Mexico experience explosive violence and relative calm at different times. Juarez, the Mexican city just across the border from El Paso, experienced horrific drug violence between 2008 and 2012, peaking at 3,766 homicides in 2010, dropping back to 256 in 2015. (By contrast, in 2010 El Paso had a total of five murders.)

Some 2,000 dead bodies have been found in hidden graves in Mexico, and over 30,000 people have disappeared without a trace.

in 2017, a newly hot drug war is roiling Mexico just south of the border patrol’s Rio Grande Valley Sector. “The Reynosa faction of the Gulf Cartel lost its boss, Comandante Toro or Juan Manuel Loaiza Salinas aka Julian Loiza Salinas. The death sparked violent infighting and clashes with Mexican authorities. Residents in the area were forced to live under complete control of Toro, with even the news outlets having to answer to him.” (Hat tip: Director Blue.)

There are five border control sectors that cover Texas, from East to West: Rio Grande Valley, Laredo, Del Rio, Marfa, and El Paso. Reynosa is directly south of McAllen.

At least 36 people have been killed in drug violence in Reynosa alone this year. Just this week, they machine gunned to death a seven year old boy during a failed carjacking.

In other drug cartel news:

  • Just today, eight members of the La Familia drug cartel in Austin and San Antonio were sentenced to prison:
    • Oscar Maldonado, 32 of Austin, was sentenced to 78 months in prison.
    • Julio Rogel, 20 of Austin, was sentenced to 88 months in prison.
    • Jose Duenas, 35 of Austin, was sentenced to 60 months in prison.
    • Jorge Arellano, 36 of Austin, was sentenced to 88 months in prison.
    • Javier Jaimes, 28 of Austin, was sentenced to 72 months in prison.
    • Javier Alvarez, 26 of San Antonio, was sentenced to 57 months in prison.
    • Jaime Carbajal, 26 of Austin, was sentenced to 42 months in prison.
    • Hugo Rodriguez, 31 of Austin, was sentenced to 70 months in prison.

    “Investigators found 75 kilograms of methamphetamine during their investigation, along with nine kilograms of cocaine and around $175,000 in cash.” Three more members await sentencing.

  • Marciano Millan Vasquez, a hitman for the Zeta drug cartel was just sentence to seven life sentences for numerous murders in San Antonio.
  • At least three Uber drivers were executed in Monterrey, Neuvo Leon.
  • LinkSwarm for Friday, November 11, 2011 (11/11/11)

    Friday, November 11th, 2011

    I hope you’re celebrating both Veterans Day and Nigel Tufnel Day (11/11/11) today. A few bits of news:

  • Willisms debunks a lot of false claims about Texas jobs.
  • He also notes that Texas leads the nation in exports.
  • Care for a disabled child in Michigan? The SEIU can deduct union dues from your social security check. (Hat tip: Ace of Spades.)
  • I’ve not been keeping up with the situation in Killeen, but evidently City Council members voted to give the City Manager a $750,000 buyout, then refused to justify their actions to the taxpayers. The result? All five remaining City Council members were successfully recalled. Note to politicians across the state: Texas is not California. Try to get away with this sort of self-dealing here and we will boot your ass out of office. (Hat tip: Blue Dot Blues.)
  • Mexican cartel gunmen crossed into the small Texas town of Escobares in the Rio Grande Valley.
  • Speaking of cartel violence, the Mexican government evidently has the La Familia Michoacana drug gang on the ropes. La Familia was previously allied with the Gulf Cartel, but more recently worked with the Zeta cartel. I’d previously mentioned La Familia (and their activity in Austin) here.
  • Obama to tax Christmas trees in order to pay for a board to promote Christmas trees.
  • Democrats on the “SuperCommittee” propose…wait for it…wait for it…spending more money! Remember, any time a congressional Democrat says they want to cut spending, they’re lying. (If a Republican says they want to cut spending, there’s at least a possibility that they’re telling the truth.)
  • David Brooks praises Mitt Romney as “smart” and “sophisticated.” Yeah, like conservatives needed another reason to vote against Romney…
  • By contrast, George Will says that in Romney “Republicans may have found their Michael Dukakis.” (What’s the difference between David Brooks and George Will? One is a well-dressed, articulate, sophisticated, respected conservative columnist, and the other is David Brooks.)
  • Related.
  • Search and Rescue trailer stolen from NW Austin. Contact your local police if you spot the trailer shown in the picture.
  • I already mentioned this yesterday, but here’s the video of Sen. John Cornyn laying the smackdown on Eric Holder as to the difference between Wide Receiver and Fast and Furious.

  • I’ll try to do a Greek/Euro debt update just as soon as I figure out just what the hell Europe is actually doing…

    Fast and Furious Update for October 11, 2011

    Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

    Either I’m getting a little better handle on things, or Fast and Furious revelations have slowed down just enough for me to keep up.

  • Looks like a subpoena is heading Eric Holder’s way.
  • Holder does not look like a happy camper:

  • The DEA appears to be even more involved with Fast and Furious than previously reported.
  • Obama’s popularity is dropping steeply with Hispanics…and Fast and Furious isn’t helping.
  • The MSM seems to have noticed that the Mexican cartels employee heavily armed paramilitary units, which anyone following the story on blogs would have known for, oh, at least a year.
  • The myth of the good drug cartel.
  • Report from the front lines of the Mexican drug war.
  • (Hat tips: Sipsey Street, Say Uncle, and the usual suspects.)